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List of Resources for HIV and Intimate Partner Violence (IPV)

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Background

  • The terms intimate partner violence (IPV) and domestic violence (DV) are often used interchangeably. While the term IPV is used throughout this issue brief for consistency, the individual statutes and policies cited may have originally employed the term DV

Domestic Component

  • National Prevention Council. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Surgeon General. National Prevention Strategy. Washington, DC., 2011.
  • Reed A. C. Siemieniuk, et al. “The Clinical Implications of High Rates of Intimate Partner Violence Against HIV-Positive Women.” JAIDS: Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes. 64:1(2013): 32-38.
  • Sally Zierler, et al. “Violence Victimization After HIV Infection in a U.S. Probability Sample of Adult Patients in Primary Care.” American Journal of Public Health. 90:2(2000): 208-215.
  • 19 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Intersection of Intimate Partner Violence and HIV in Women,” 2014. Accessed, October 13, 2014.

  • Andrea Carlson Gielen, Karen A. McDonnell, Jessica G. Burke, and Patricia O’Campo. “Women’s Lives After an HIV-Positive Diagnosis: Disclosure and Violence.” Maternal and Child Health Journal. 4:2(2000):111-119.
  • Reed A. C. Siemieniuk, et al. “The Clinical Implications of High Rates of Intimate Partner Violence Against HIV-Positive Women.” JAIDS: Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes. 64:1(2013):32-38.

International Component

  • Allison R. Webel, et al. “The Impact of Social Context on Self-Management in Women Living with HIV.” Social Science & Medicine. 87 (2013): 147–154.

Male Perspective, Domestic and International

  • Among men overall, it is estimated that 23% have experienced sexual violence other than rape during their lifetimes. These rates are higher among gay and bisexual men, for whom lifetime prevalence of sexual violence other than rape was reported to be 40% and 47%, respectively. In another recent study 18% of gay and bisexual men reported having experienced forced-sex at some point in their lifetimes. With men too, the experience of HIV and IPV appear to be intertwined. Twelve percent of HIV positive men who reported having sex with men in one nationally representative study also reported experiencing violence by a partner or someone close to them since their diagnosis, with nearly half believing that the violence was related to their HIV status. (Sources: Matthew J. Breiding, et al. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Prevalence and Characteristics of Sexual Violence, Stalking, and Intimate Partner Violence Victimization — National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey, United States, 2011. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. 63:SS08 (2014), 1-18.; Mikel L. Walters, Jieru Chen, and Matthew J. Breiding. National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS): 2010
  • Findings on Victimization by Sexual Orientation. Atlanta, GA, 2013.; Liz Hamel, et al. Kaiser Family Foundation. “HIV/AIDS In The Lives Of Gay And Bisexual Men In The United States,” 2014.; Sally Zierler, et al. “Violence Victimization After HIV Infection in a U.S. Probability Sample of Adult Patients in Primary Care.” American Journal of Public Health. 90:2(2000): 208-215.)

Adolescent Component

Psychological Component

  • Gina Dillon, Rafat Hussain, Deborah Loxton, and Saifur Rahman. “Mental and Physical Health and Intimate Partner Violence Against Women: A Review of the Literature.” International Journal of Family Medicine, vol.2013 (2013).
  • Mayumi Okuda, et al. “Mental Health of Victims of Intimate Partner Violence: Results From a National Epidemiologic Survey.” Psychiatric Services. 62:8 (2011),959-62.
  • E. L. Machtinger, T. C. Wilson, J. E. Haberer, and D. S. Weiss. “Psychological Trauma and PTSD in HIV-Positive Women: A Meta-Analysis.” AIDS and Behavior. 16:8 (2012): 2091-2100.
  • E. L. Machtinger, J. E. Haberer, T. C. Wilson, and D. S. Weiss. “Recent Trauma is Associated with Antiretroviral Failure and HIV Transmission Risk Behavior Among HIV-Positive Women and Female-Identified Transgenders.”AIDS and Behavior. 16:8(2012): 2160–2170.
  • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Agency (SAMHSA). “Key Terms: Definitions.” SAMHSA News. 22(2): 2014. Accessed October 22, 2014,
  • E. L. Machtinger, J. E. Haberer, T. C. Wilson, and D. S. Weiss. “Recent Trauma is Associated with Antiretroviral Failure and HIV Transmission Risk Behavior Among HIV-Positive Women and Female-Identified Transgenders.” AIDS and Behavior. 16:8(2012): 2160–2170.

Health Care Providers Component

 


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